Geekery

MP3 Lives On

“MP3 is dead” missed the real, much better story

Marco Arment has perhaps the most lucid take on the “MP3 Is Dead!” articles that sites like Engadget and Gizmodo have done over the last few days. The truth is, the expiration of software patents regarding MP3 is a good thing. It doesn’t kill the format. If anything, the patent expiration will give the format new life.

From the article:

MP3 is very old, but it’s the same age as JPEG, which has also long since been surpassed in quality by newer formats. JPEG is still ubiquitous not because Engadget forgot to declare its death, but because it’s good enough and supported everywhere, making it the most pragmatic choice most of the time.

•••

MP3 is supported by everything, everywhere, and is now patent-free. There has never been another audio format as widely supported as MP3, it’s good enough for almost anything, and now, over twenty years since it took the world by storm, it’s finally free.

 

Personal Notes

Comparing Apples to Lemons

Windows 10 is a visually striking operating system. It’s bold; it’s colorful; and it has a strong support for modern and legacy applications. It highlights one of the weaker parts of the Mac ecosystem. There is simply not the backwards compatibility in the world of Apple that there is in Microsoft’s environment. I can’t just grab a copy of Diablo for the Mac off my shelf and start playing, but I can with a modern PC. However, that legacy also comes with baggage, and that baggage can lead to performance issues in less powerful PCs. My current Asus is an example of just that.

When I first wrote about the Asus, I noted that I was surprised it was running similar specs to my wife’s 2011 MacBook Air.

Here are the basic specs of each:

  • MacBook Air 2011: 1.8 GHz Intel Core i7 “Sandy Bridge” 64-bit processor, 4 GB 1333 MHz DDR3 memory, 256 GB SSD.
  • Asus X551M 2015: 1.86 Intel Celeron “Bay Trail” 64-bit processor, 4 GB 1600 MHz DDR3 memory, 500 GB HDD.

The only advantage our Mac has in terms of raw specs is its SSD (well, also a better display, backlit keyboard, better wireless connectivity, and better battery life; but I digress). In the other areas that matter, the Asus wins on paper. It has a slightly faster and more modern processor, and it has faster memory. However, in day-to-day use, the Asus feels so much slower. So I decided to put it to the test.

The Test

I performed some very basic tasks on both machines and timed them. We’re not talking batching Photoshop filters here or anything. This is all simple stuff you are likely to do every day.

Start Up

For this test, both machines started fully powered down. I stopped the timer when I could click on something and it responded. On Windows, it was the Start Menu; on the Mac it was the Finder icon in the Dock.

  • Asus – 1:15
  • MacBook Air – 0:43

Launch Firefox

Here, I simply clicked on the Firefox icon — from the Start Menu for the PC and from Launchpad for the Mac. I stopped the timer when the homepage was done loading.

  • Asus – 0:29
  • MacBook Air – 0:03

Copy and Paste

I copied my iCloud documents directory to the desktop of each. Both were synced and only copying local data. The size of the folder was 1.85 GB.

  • Asus – 7:34
  • MacBook Air – 1:08

Empty Trash

I made sure the Trash Can (Mac) and Recycle Bin (Windows) were already empty. I moved the same directory as above into each and then prompted the OS to empty trash/recycling.

  • Asus – 0:25
  • MacBook Air – 0:05

Shut Down

I started timing as soon as I hit the shut down command and stopped timing when the computer stopped making any noise.

  • Asus – 0:31
  • MacBook Air – 0:12

Geekbench Browser

These are just the raw numbers from the Geekbench web app. Larger numbers are better.

  • Asus
    • Single Core: 949
    • Multi-Core: 3101
  • MacBook Air
    • Single Core: 2505
    • Multi-Core: 4564

Conclusion

If the hardware specs are nearly identical, then the differentiating factor has to be the software (as well as the SSD in the Mac). This is Apple’s advantage to me, and it’s why any comparison between machines that does not take the operating system into account is incomplete. Simply put, on similar hardware, macOS performs better than Windows. A more modest Mac may feel quicker than a more impressively-specced PC. Yes, you can get more PC for the same price as a Mac, but you know what? You’re going to need it.

It’s also why a Mac tends to have a longer life than a comparable PC. I’ve owned three Mac laptops since the year 2000. My PowerBook G3 lasted seven years before biting the dust. I replaced that with a MacBook Pro that lasted a modest four years. (It was taken out of commission by a toddler.) This MacBook Air I’m typing on has lasted six years, and it’s still going strong. As for the 2015 Asus? I don’t really want to turn it on again. I’ve given it a fair chance, both through Ubuntu and Windows, and the end result is that I’m ready to return to the Mac fold.

Personal Notes

The Only Thing I Will Write About the Healthcare Bill (I Hope)

In May of 2002, I was wrapping up my first year of teaching. My wife and I were approaching our first anniversary. We were renting our first apartment. It was a year full of firsts. Little did we know the trial awaiting us. Little did we know the highs and lows waiting in that summer of 2002 nor the crippling blow this year would have on our financial futures. In May of 2002, I was diagnosed with cancer.

After the initial surgery and recovery, my treatments went well. I didn’t need chemotherapy. I was just scheduled a series of radiation treatments. It’s odd how time softens certain facts, for I don’t remember the precise number. However, I remember the side effects. When I pull into a certain parking garage near IU Health in downtown Indianapolis, I still start to feel sick. My side effects were bad.

In the midst of the radiation treatments and my near constant state of illness, the unthinkable happened. Our insurance through my job decided I didn’t need as many treatments as the doctors prescribed. They didn’t inform us of this until after the treatments were complete and the bills were coming in. What ensued was a multi-week uphill battle between ourselves and our insurance company, and the company won. We were stuck with around $30,000.00 in untouched medical bills.

We then did something foolish. I’ll admit that. We were ignorant of the fact that we could arrange a no-interest payment plan through the hospital, and we panicked. We were overdue and being referred to a collection agency. Our checking and saving accounts combined maybe added up to $1,000. So we charged it. We put the entire amount on a credit card. It was the wrong thing to do, but we were young and didn’t know what else to do. A sizable piece of that debt is still with us to this day. Fifteen years later, it’s the single biggest obstacle between us and being able to plan for a secure financial future.

The Affordable Care Act was meant to protect people like me from having something like this ever happen again. It was not perfect; no one contests that. But instead of trying to improve on a foundation built around consumer protection, our current administration and majority party wish to roll back these protections. They can say catch phrases about paying for someone else’s healthcare all they want, but that was never what the ACA was about. It was about making sure all had access to reasonable healthcare and that corporations could not put their own interests ahead of the lives and well-being of the American citizens who rely on their coverage.

Here are some points from the proposed American Health Care Act (AHCA):

  • The Medicaid expansion is being phased out. This will be devastating to low-income individuals and families above the poverty line. (My income when I was a first year teacher was only a couple thousand dollars above the poverty line for families.)
  • The new bill makes it easier for states to remove individuals and families from state Medicaid programs or raise premiums for children.
  • Tax credits would now be figured by age rather than income. A young man making $60,000 a year will get a bigger credit than a senior living on a fixed income of $35,000 a year. AHCA financially favors the young and wealthy over older and lower-income individuals. Those who are at the highest risk are put into a more precarious position.
  • AHCA allows price discrimination based on pre-existing conditions, such as cancer like I had. Other pre-existing conditions include things like having been sexually assaulted and having had a c-section. This alone will put millions at risk of being unable to afford insurance, and to be honest: It takes a special type of cruelty to charge a woman more for insurance for having been violated.
  • It allows states to opt out of requiring insurance companies to cover ACA’s core 10:
    • Ambulatory patient services
    • Emergency services
    • Hospitalization
    • Pregnancy, maternity, and newborn care
    • Mental health and substance use disorder services
    • Prescription drugs
    • Rehabilitative services and devices
    • Lab services
    • Preventive care, wellness services, and chronic disease management
    • Pediatric services
  • It will allow multi-state corporations to abide by the most-lenient rules of the states they operate in and allows employee plans to remove catastrophic coverage provisions.

In short, AHCA could result in millions of Americans losing access to healthcare. Before ACA, my wife and I managed to keep our heads above water despite a catastrophic health situation. Not all people will be so fortunate. This is a potentially devastating piece of legislation, and the true tragedy is that many of those who voted for our current administration will likely be the hardest hit.

I don’t want anyone to face the choices my family did. What’s going on right now is not about fiscal conservatism. It is about moral bankruptcy.

Commentary, Geekery

Ubuntu 16.04 Impressions

I have to rediscover my Bluetooth mouse on a regular basis.

I love the idea of Open Source software. I just wish it loved me back as much. Outside of the excellent MuseScore, I consistently find myself frustrated or disappointed by my time with open alternatives to commercial software. OpenOffice and LibreOffice have great features, but they aren’t the easiest on my eyes. SongBird was a nice idea, but I found the actual implementation to be clunky. I love Firefox‘s privacy settings, but it integrates poorly into macOS. The SWORD Project has a great mission, but it can be very confusing to actually use. And the same is true of Ubuntu. I love the idea. I just don’t love using it. Case in point: it can’t remember my mouse.

At first I thought the issue might be with my Bluetooth adapter, so I booted back into Windows to check how the mice behaves there. Windows 10 has no problem reliably reconnected to the mouse between uses. Ubuntu, however, loses the mouse constantly — every time the computer goes to sleep and every time I shut down. The only reliable solution is to go into my Bluetooth settings, remove the mouse, and then re-add it. It may seem a small thing, but it illustrates my entire experience with the operating system.

A Quick History Lesson

A screenshot from an older version of Ubuntu
Ubuntu 6.06, the first version I used. GPL, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=935008

Ubuntu is a Linux operating system that Canonical launched back in 2004, and it has become the most popular Linux distribution (distro). It is built around security and ease-of-use, and it’s billed as a truly user-friendly flavor of Linux. Over the years, Ubuntu has gained more capabilities and has continued to refine the user experience. 2010 saw one of the biggest pushes in this direction with the adoption of a windowing system called Unity, which brought a new look-and-feel to the Ubuntu desktop environment while also being more space-efficient on smaller screens.

I’ve used various versions of Ubuntu off and on for years, but I’ve always returned to macOS as my primary operating system. Right now, that’s not a choice in the short term, so I’ve been more motivated than I have in the past to make Ubuntu my primary environment. While I can say it’s come a long way, I’m still not convinced it’s the best non-Mac solution for people who just want something that will work and require little attention or maintenance.

Look and Feel

a screenshot of the Ubuntu desktop showing off the file manager

Ubuntu looks great on the surface. This is, in itself, a nice surprise. Many open source applications struggle from a visual design perspective. In many ways it does feel a little dated with its use of heavy gradients for illusory depth, gloss on folders, and the rather basic transparency/blur filters, but those details feel more charming than antiquated. I’d say Elementary OS has a small advantage over Ubuntu in terms of pure aesthetics, but it’s still one of the better-looking Linux distros. From the boot screen to the shut down dialogue, you can see the care put into the overall visual design.

Ubuntu also gets credit for some daring color choices. Where Windows and macOS make safe choices with grays, blues, whites, and blacks through most of their interfaces, Ubuntu bravely sports shades of purple and orange. It gives the system a unique look, and even from a distance or over the shoulder, it’s certainly recognizable to those familiar with the system. I wasn’t a fan when older versions of Ubuntu relied heavily on browns and golds, but the purple and orange scheme is quite striking.

Firefox on Ubuntu
Mozilla Firefox

The Unity windowing system also gets credit for improving some third-party offerings. I usually have a hard time swallowing LibreOffice’s heavy toolbar gradients, but Unity smooths them out entirely. Even Firefox looks downright respectable in Unity. If you want the prettiest Linux distro available, check out Elementary OS. But Ubuntu holds a close second in my book, and it gets better with each subsequent release.

Usability and Features

Ubuntu’s biggest draw has historically been its ease-of-use compared to other Linux-based operating systems. For the most part, it succeeds well in this mission. However, its shortcomings are pretty glaring when they happen, and they demonstrate how hard it is for any Linux distro to move away from the challenges faced by those that have come before. For example, there’s no easy way to change the brightness of your screen, and it’s been that way for years. To anyone used to working with macOS, you know a couple of the function keys (or Touch Bar buttons) accomplish this in no time. Ubuntu and its relatives are yet to address this simple convenience.

Ubuntu Dash showing numerous applications

Ubuntu Dash is impressive and overwhelming. Last time I used Ubuntu, this area was more of an application launcher. Over the years, however, it’s gained more functionality, to the point where it is more comparable to Spotlight on macOS than any basic app launcher. The beauty of Spotlight is that it doesn’t begin to give you results until you begin searching. In contrast, Dash shows a ton of items the moment you launch it, and it can be a bit overwhelming.

Take the Application tab in Dash as an example; if you expand the list of installed applications, be prepared. Where something like LaunchPad on macOS selectively determines what applications are user-facing, Dash shows everything. It’s to the point where things like Reboot and individual preferences are displayed in the list alongside some downright obscurely-named things like QJackCtl. All of that said, though, the search function of Dash works really well. The only drawback is that it doesn’t search the contents of documents the way Spotlight will. I have numerous old sermons archived by nothing more than the date they were delivered. Being able to search the contents of those documents through Spotlight was a life saver on my Mac.

Ubunu preferences

Then there are the times I’m trying to do something simple like highlighting a paragraph I want to copy when suddenly Ubuntu misinterprets what I’m doing with the trackpad and begins rapid-switching between applications. This wouldn’t be a big deal if there was an easily accessible location to customize trackpad gestures, but there isn’t. Sure, there might be some command line magic I can do to fix this, but that undermines the entire point of Ubuntu. (I also should point out here that I can adjust trackpad sensitivity but not mouse sensitivity. Odd.) It stops being user-friendly when I can’t simply adjust such a major piece of functionality.

Ecosystem

screenshot of the Ubuntu app software center

I’m not going to mince words here. If you rely heavily on Apple-specific or Microsoft-specific applications, you’re going to be disappointed. Yes, there are some equivalents. There’s LibreOffice in place of Microsoft Office or iWork. There’s Inkscape in place of Adobe Illustrator. There’s Gweled instead of Bejeweled. Minecraft is available, however, if you don’t mind jumping through some hoops.

An application called Ubuntu Software serves as a sort of app store for Ubuntu. If you fins something you are interested in here, you can download it and Ubuntu Software will handle the installation process. Installing applications from external sources can be somewhat dicier. It involves downloading a software package. If the system recognizes this package for what it is, it will try to let Ubuntu Software handle installation. This is an bit of a mixed bag. I never did successfully install the Vivaldi web browser.

Performance

Ubuntu is a clear winner in terms of performance on modest specs. Before installing Ubuntu, I spent a few days in Windows 10, and then Elementary OS was the first Linux distro I tried. Ubuntu runs more smoothly than either. Elementary OS performed acceptably with the exception of the application launcher. There was a noticeable lag between clicking the icon and the launcher opening — enough of a lag that I would often click it twice, only to have it suddenly open and immediately close.

Windows 10 is perhaps the roughest experience from a performance perspective. It’s obvious Windows 10 is more resource-hungry than either Elementary OS or Ubuntu. Running Windows 10, I can often type faster than the computer will render. Ubuntu runs fairly smoothly in everyday tasks. Editing images in GIMP and complex web apps like Microsoft PowerPoint 365 slow things down considerably, but that’s as much the hardware as anything. The side effect of all this is that Ubuntu consistently got better battery life as well, about an hour more per charge than Windows 10.

Unfortunately, performance is more than raw speed. It’s also reliability and predictability, and that’s where my experience with Ubuntu starts to break down. It intermittently forgets my trusted WiFi networks, or it won’t see them at all. As mentioned before, it constantly loses my Bluetooth mouse. These issues were the deal-breaker for me; on top of some software unpredictability and unreliable updates, having to constantly restart my computer to do something like connect to my home WiFi met my frustration threshold.

Under the Hood

The managed live kernel is a fantastic idea. I love the idea of OS updates without having to always reboot the system. The fact that my system has yet to successfully run an update may be evidence why commercial operating systems like Windows and macOS are yet to adopt such a feature. It’s certainly an exciting goal, and it should change the world of computing. Already, I was to the point where I never restarted my Mac except for system-level updates. Live kernel could potentially eliminate that need as well.

Unfortunately, software updates have completely stopped working for me. I consistently get an error message that the package manager is broken. It gives me a command to run in the Terminal, which then returns nothing. This is especially problematic when it comes to system security as the security updates are simply not installing. And no amount of rebooting or Terminal fiddling has overcome the problem. If the connectivity problems had not already been a deal-breaker, this would have.

Conclusion

At the end of the day, I’ll be removing my Ubuntu partition pretty soon and settling for Windows 10 until I can return to the Apple fold. While I have reservations about Windows 10 — most notably around general performance and security — I’d rather deal with slow but predictable any day. Ubuntu may be snappier, but my experience has been far less predictable. Every major operating system comes with its own sets of concessions and frustrations, even macOS, but Ubuntu’s added up to too much for my tastes.

Overall, Ubuntu is on a good track. It’s come a long way since the first time I ran a live CD. It still has a long way to go, and it’s just not where I want it to be for my own daily use. Some more mindfulness in how the Dash presents its information, some rethinking how software installation goes, smoothing out the wireless experience, and being thoughtful about user input settings — these could go a long way into making Ubuntu a more welcoming and user-friendly experience. It might well be the most user-friendly version of Linux to date, but that’s still an unfortunately low bar to clear.

Quick Recommendations

Despite my rough experiences, if you want to give Ubuntu a try for yourself to see just how wrong I am, here are some recommendations for applications:

* I’d probably recommend Vivaldi based on my experiences with it on other platforms, but I could never successfully install it on Ubuntu.

Technology

Apple Park

Apple Park opens to employees in April

From the press release:

“Steve’s vision for Apple stretched far beyond his time with us. He intended Apple Park to be the home of innovation for generations to come,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “The workspaces and parklands are designed to inspire our team as well as benefit the environment. We’ve achieved one of the most energy-efficient buildings in the world and the campus will run entirely on renewable energy.”
Designed in collaboration with Foster + Partners, Apple Park replaces 5 million square feet of asphalt and concrete with grassy fields and over 9,000 native and drought-resistant trees, and is powered by 100 percent renewable energy. With 17 megawatts of rooftop solar, Apple Park will run one of the largest on-site solar energy installations in the world. It is also the site of the world’s largest naturally ventilated building, projected to require no heating or air conditioning for nine months of the year.
 To me, this effort is quintessentially Apple. It’s dramatic and overambitious, but it’s also intentional and beautiful. It’s additionally going to be a big win for clean energy. Alongside companies like Facebook and Google who are  closing in on 100% renewable energy this year, Apple is putting their money where their ideals are and demonstrating that a renewable energy future is not simply a Utopian pipe dream. It’s good business.